The 19th century

The 19th century opens with the fall of the Venetian Republic (1797) and the French armies settled in the former Venetian dominions, such as Padua, which would see the alternation of the Jacobin, Austrian and Italic regimes until 1813.

By way of the Napoleonic decree of Saint-Cloud (1806), the University of Padua was put on a par with those of Pavia and Bologna and lost the independence that it had enjoyed over the centuries in the name of a new university. The distinction between Universitas Iuristarum and Universitas Artistorum disappeared, as did the nationes; the rector, appointed by the viceroy, became the key intermediary between the university and the central government.
The beginning of the third Austrian domination coincided with a period of relative stability and the Studio itself lost its age-old structure. Despite the rigorous Austrian control over the administrative structure and the teaching, the University remained faithful to its ancient traditions as regards the value and responsibility of many professors, as well as to its high-level education provided to its students whose spirit of freedom and independence had distinguished the University throughout the centuries. This spirit was also at the basis of the student insurrection of 8 February 1848 (and of the others which would take place until 1866), which saw students and citizens unite against the Austrians.
A new phase for the University of Padova began with the annexation of Veneto to the Kingdom of Italy (1866). In 1872, the University was put on a par with the others of the Kingdom and reacquired an identity that was also projected beyond national borders.

Palazzo Bo was no longer spacious enough to house all the schools and, towards the end of the century, the policy of decentralisation of the scientific institutes began.

1817

THE FACULTIES BECOME DEPARTMENTS

The Faculties are transformed into Departments and a director is appointed to each one

1831

Caffè Pedrocchi

Il Caffè Pedrocchi in una stampa antica

Inauguration of the new Caffè Pedrocchi

1835

Domenico Turazza

Domenico Turazza

Domenico Turazza graduated in Mathematics from the University of Padua

1841

Arnaldo Fusinato

Arnaldo Fusinato graduated in public law from the University of Padua

1842

FOURTH MEETING OF ITALIAN SCIENTISTS

The fourth meeting of Italian scientists was held in Padua

1848

ON 8 FEBRUARY 1848

ON 8 FEBRUARY 1848

On 8 February 1848, the citizens of Padua, led by the University students, rebelled against the Austrian garrison making them flee from the city in three days

1854

Ippolito Nievo

Ippolito Nievo graduated in politics and law from the University of Padua

1863

ENRICO BERNARDI’S DEGREE

ENRICO BERNARDI’S DEGREE

He graduated in mathematics from the University of Padua. In 1884, at the International Exhibition of Turin, he presented the world’s first prototype of a vehicle powered by a petrol combustion engine. It won a gold medal

1866

GIUSTO BELLAVITIS FIRST RECTOR OF THE KINGDOM OF ITALY

GIUSTO BELLAVITIS FIRST RECTOR OF THE KINGDOM OF ITALY

The Plebiscite of 1966 decreed the annexation of Veneto to the Kingdom of Italy. Giusto Bellavitis was the first Italian rector of the University of Padua

1869

Giovanni Canestrini

Giovanni Canestrini

Giovanni Canestrini began his teaching career at the University of Padua

1890

Palazzo Cavalli

Palazzo Cavalli

Palazzo Cavalli was transferred to the Royal University and became the School of Engineering according to the drawing of the architect Pio Chicchi

1891-96

Carlo Francesco Ferraris and the university reform

Carlo Francesco Ferraris, rettore 1891-1896

Carlo Francesco Ferraris was rector of the University, where he reorganised the administration, the historical archive, enhanced several scientific institutes, and much more besides. He was also the author of an important proposal to reform universities  

1894

Tullio Levi Civita

Tullio Levi Civita

Tullio Levi Civita graduated in Mathematics from the University of Padua