The 14th century

At the start of the 14th century, Padua reached the peak of its independent splendour, with professors from all over Europe coming here to teach: in 1305, Pietro d’Abano, the philosopher, doctor and astrologer and a famous name in medieval medicine, was called to Padua from the University of Paris. His successors included Nicolò Santa Sofia, Giacomo and Giovanni Dondi dall’Orologio.

The Carraresi Signoria made the university even more prestigious, calling in famous professors to attract more students. Padua soon became a point of reference for culture and research in the western world, on a par with Bologna, Oxford and Cambridge.

Towards the end of the 14th century, the association of philosophy and medicine students became intolerant, causing the break-up of the older “Universitas Iuristarum” and the subsequent creation of the “Universitas Artistarum” in 1399. This new institution was fully independent from an organisational point of view, which can be seen by the fact that an independent chancellor was elected: the student Benedetto Greco.

1305

Pietro d’Abano

The philosopher, doctor and astrologer, Pietro d’Abano, was called to Padua from the University of Paris

1313

The withdrawal of imperial privileges

Henry VII of Luxembourg condemned the city and its university, withdrawing imperial privileges

1321

New migration of students from Bologna in the 14th century

New migration of students from Bologna in the 14th century

A new migration of students from the University of Bologna presented plenty of advantages for the University of Padova

1330

First collection of charters of the University of Jurists

The first systematic collection of charters of the University of Jurists was compiled, leading to the code created approximately 80 years later

1344

Famous professors called to Padua

Famous professors called to Padua

The first evidence of famous “foreign” professors being called to Padua

1350

Nicolò, Giovanni and Marsilio Santasofia

Galenus

The “monarcha medicinae” passed away: Nicolò Santasofia, who studied under Pietro d’Abano and was a professor in Padua until the year he died. His scientific legacy was passed down to his sons Giovanni and Marsilio

1354

Giovanni Dondi dall’Orologio

Giovanni Dondi dall’Orologio

Giovanni Dondi dall’Orologio began teaching in Padua: he held courses in astronomy, medicine and logic

1363

Theology Department founded

Upon the request of Francesco da Carrara Senior and authorised by Pope Urban V

1377

Saint Catherine of Alexandria – Patron saint of students

Saint Catherine of Alexandria – Patron saint of students

A festival dedicated to St. Catherine of Alexandria, patron saint of students, was created. This saint is featured in the University of Padova’s seal, alongside Christ the Redeemer

1399

Universitas Artistarum founded

Universitas Artistarum founded

The Universitas Artistarum was founded: Francesco Novello da Carrara, a lord from Padua, established the definitive independence of the artists from the jurists