The 15th century

The start of the 15th century saw the destruction of the Carraresi Signoria and the onset of Venetian rule, as the Serenissima Republic won the battle for the city in 1405. From this date until the Republic fell in 1797, the University of Padua was the only university centre in the area controlled by the Serenissima. Convinced that “famous professors attract lots of students”, the Venetian government called many illustrious professors to Padua, including many foreign professors, such as the well-known jurists Raffaele Fulgosio and Raffale Raimondi da Como. It is said that students “from all over the world ran to Padua, to the two Raffaels”. Many illustrious foreign students would be immortalised in the “Sala dei 40” five centuries later. In the 1450s, the university went through a crisis in terms of both attendance and prestige, but it then experienced a new “golden era” during the last quarter of the 15th century. In 1493, the university of law was granted use of the buildings belonging to the hotel with the emblem of the ox, with the aim of creating a single seat for the various schools of jurists.

1405

PADUA AND ITS UNIVERSITY FELL UNDER THE CONTROL OF THE SERENISSIMA REPUBLIC

Padua and its university fell under the control of the Serenissima: Venice won the battle for the city and brought the Carraresi Signoria to an end

1407

VENICE ESTABLISHED EDUCATIONAL PROTECTIONISM

15th century map of the Venetian territories

Venice established educational protectionism, obliging all Venetians and subjects under Venetian rule who wanted to pursue further education to study at the University of Padova

1409

FAMOUS FOREIGN PROFESSORS HIRED

Venice encouraged the hiring of famous foreign professors; Raffaele Fulgosio and then Raffale Raimondi da Como were both called to Padua

1410

Francesco Zabarella

Francesco Zabarella

Up until this year, Francesco Zabarella taught decretals at the University of Padua (canon law)

1413

PROFESSORS’ SALARIES

The Senate ruled that taxes on prostitutes and public toilets would be used to pay professors

1417

THE ROLE OF SOLE CHANCELLOR

The jurists’ transalpine and cisalpine universitates officially adopted a sole chancellor, alternating on an annual basis

1423

Nicholas of Cusa and “learned ignorance”

Nicholas of Cusa

This is the year the German philosopher Nicholas of Cusa graduated in canon law from the University of Padova. In his work, “De docta ignorantia”, he explained his “learned ignorance” theory

1439

PRIVILEGES GRANTED TO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

The papal bull passed by Pope Eugene IV Condulmer guaranteed privileges to anyone studying at the University of Padova

1450

UNIVERSITY OF PADUA IN CRISIS

In the 1450s, the University of Padua went through a period of crisis: the number of students more than halved compared with the previous period

1458

Janus Pannonius

Janus Pannonius

The Hungarian poet, writer and father of humanism, Janus Pannonius, graduated in canon law from Padua. There is a portrait of him in the Sala dei Quaranta

1465

DISSECTION OF THE HUMAN BODY

Dissection by the “Fasciculus Medicinae”

The German medical student, Hartmann Schedel, takes part in the “solemn honouring of the human body being dissected”

1493

BEFORE THE BO: ACQUISITION OF THE “HOSPITIUM BOVIS”

BEFORE THE BO: ACQUISITION OF THE “HOSPITIUM BOVIS”

The chancellor Bernardo Gil and his jurist advisers were granted use of the buildings belonging to a former “Hospitium Bovis”.